Five Stars: “A great tale of WW 2 daring, intrigue and heroism”

Farewell Leicester Square
Farewell Leicester Square

2005. Terrorists target London in an attack which makes headlines around the world.

Elsewhere, a fishing boat makes a remarkable find: a World War II bomber, hundreds of miles from where records show it disappeared.

The two events combine when journalist Jon Kilkade takes a blood-curdling phone-call.

It describes a suicide mission to destroy London. Not in 2005, but during the chaotic final months of the Nazi Third Reich.

The action in this fast-paced novel switches from occupied Jersey to the lives of SOE and Resistance fighters in Belgium.

At its heart is a deadly circle of Nazi fanatics intent on creating a final blitz which would see the people of London wiped from the face of the earth.

A riveting thriller in the tradition of Jack Higgins and Alistair MacLean.

SOME OF THE 5***** REVIEWS ON AMAZON:
“A thoroughly enjoyable read. Full of intrigue and some shocks along the way. Historical wartime descriptions are incredibly accurate and deftly pull you into the story. It’s almost as if you’re there. Looking forward to the next one by Mr Kilkade.”
*****
5.0 out of 5 stars A tale of intrigue and heroism
“A great tale of WW 2 daring, intrigue and heroism told in a gripping way. Well researched and I’m sure based on detailed gleaned from true stories of the people who risked their lives to help other. Recommend.”
*****
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb thriller
“The book starts in the modern day but soon goes back to WWII and sets up an interesting character who escapes Jersey before the island is occupied by the Nazis. I didn’t know where the story was going and it really zipped along once the main mission started. Lots of action and intrigue. Loved it and well worth a read.”
*****
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb!
“I loved this novel for so many reasons – believeable characters, excellent research and an exciting plotline. I was caught in the storytellers trap from beginning to end.
If you like history and true to life characters and a smashing plot, this is the book for you.”
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Photos of First World War Trench Network

Hooge Trench
Hooge Trench

This is what remains of the Hooge Chateau trench network a few kilometres outside Ypres/Ieper.

The trench is in the grounds of the Hotel Kasteelhof’t Hooghe.

According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, the chateau and its stables were the scene of fierce fighting throughout the First World War.

Hotel Kasteelhof’t Hooghe (Hotel's photo)
Hotel Kasteelhof’t Hooghe (Hotel’s photo)

The staff of the 1st and 2nd Divisions were wiped out when the chateau was shelled on October 31, 1914.

From May 24 to June 3, 1915, the chateau was defended against German attacks and in July 1915, the crater was made by a mine sprung by the 3rd Division.

Shells uncovered near the trench network.
Shells uncovered near the trench network.

On July 30, the Germans took the chateau, and on August 9, it and the crater were regained by the 6th Division.

Trench at Hooge
Trench at Hooge

The Germans retook Hooge on June 6, 1916 and on July 31, 1917, the 8th Division advanced 1.6km beyond it. It was lost for the last time in April 1918, but regained by the 9th (Scottish) and 29th Divisions on September 28.

Pictures from the Hooge Cemetery, Ypres (WW1)

Hooge Crater Cemetery
Hooge Crater Cemetery

I recently visited the Hooge Crater Cemetery just east of Ypres/Ieper.

Almost 6,000 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War are buried or commemorated in this cemetery – with more than 3,500 of the burials unidentified.

Graves marked as mass burials.
Graves marked as mass burials.

Special memorials record the names of a number of casualties either known or believed to be buried among them, or whose graves in other cemeteries were destroyed by shell fire.

The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and is situated near the site of the Hooge Chateau.

Hooge, near Ypres.
Hooge, near Ypres.

The chateau and its stables were the scene of fierce fighting throughout the First World War.

I will post more about the trench network still visible in the chateau grounds tomorrow.

Two graves.
Two graves.