“Love WW2 books & this was the best I’ve read for a long while.”

Farewell Leicester Square, now only 77p on Kindle.
Farewell Leicester Square, now only 77p on Kindle.

 

Lovely new 5 star review on Kindle:

“An excellent well written story. Could not put it down. Love World War Two books and this was the best I’ve read for a long while.”

Thanks!

 

‘Superb’ thriller now only 77p!

FAREWELL LEICESTER SQUARE is now only 77p on KINDLE.

farewell1

2005. Terrorists target London in an attack which makes headlines around the world.
Elsewhere, a fishing boat makes a remarkable find: a World War II bomber, hundreds of miles from where records show it disappeared.
The two events combine when journalist Jon Kilkade takes a blood-curdling phone-call.
It describes a suicide mission to destroy London. Not in 2005, but during the chaotic final months of the Nazi Third Reich.
The action in this fast-paced novel switches from occupied Jersey to the lives of SOE and Resistance fighters in Belgium.
At its heart is a deadly circle of Nazi fanatics intent on creating a final blitz which would see the people of London wiped from the face of the earth.
A riveting thriller in the tradition of Jack Higgins and Alistair MacLean.

WHAT READERS SAY:

Superb thriller.”

A great tale of WW2 daring, intrigue and heroism told in a gripping way.”

Captivating from beginning to end. A thoroughly enjoyable read.”

The story keeps the reader wanting to find out what will happen next.

Superb. I loved this novel for so many reasons – believable characters, excellent research and an exciting plotline. I was caught in the storytellers trap from beginning to end.”

A good enjoyable read. Kept me captivated from start to finish.”

Excellent thriller. It’s well researched – lots of stuff about SOE and the resistance.”

Thoroughly enjoyable read.”

An almost excellent read. If you enjoyed the TV series “Secret Army” and “Kessler” then this book has the same feel about it.”

This Day In History: The story behind Avenue Georges Mandel

Photo street in Paris named after Georges Mandel who was killed by the Milice, 1944Spotted in Paris: this street named after executed politician, Georges Mandel.

Mandel died 69 years ago today, on July 7, in 1944 at the hands of the Milice, a paramilitary force which collaborated with the Nazis.

Born in 1885, into a prosperous family (his given name was Louis-Georges Rothschild, though he was no relation to the banking family), Mandel’s political career began at age 21 as a member of the personal staff of French Premier Georges Clemenceau. He went on to serve in the National Assembly from 1919 to 1924, and then again from 1928 to 1940.

In 1940, he was transferred to the Ministry of the Interior by then French Premier Paul Reynaud, with whom he shared the conviction that no armistice should be made with the German invaders, and that the battle should continue, even if only from France’s colonies in Africa.

After the resignation of Reynaud and the establishment of the Petain/Vichy government, Mandel sailed to Morocco, where he was arrested and sent back to France and imprisoned.

He was handed over to the Germans, and put in concentration camps in Oranienburg and Buchenwald.

Mandel was returned to Paris on July 4, 1944, as a hostage. While being transferred from one prison to another, he was captured by the Milice

Three days later, the Milice took Mandel to the Forest of Fontainebleau, where they executed him. He was buried at Passy Cemetery. 

As he was being handed over to his countrymen by the German SS, he is said to have stated: “To die is nothing. What is sad is to die without seeing the liberation of the country and the restoration of the Republic.”

Calling all experts on the French Resistance/Maquis

November 11 1943 is, I understand, a well-remembered day for historians of the Resistance in Nazi-Occupied France.

It was on that day that the Maquis paraded through the town of Oyonnax in what Matthew Cobb in his excellent book The Resistance describes as a “stunt”.

The event was designed as a show of strength, a morale boost for the local population. The town was chosen because there was no German garrison nearby.

More than 200 Maquisards took part. They marched, sang the Marseillaise and then disappeared back into the mountains.

Sometime ago I came into possession of this small medallion. It features the date ‘XI Novembre, 1943’.

One side is the Cross of Lorraine smashing a Swastika.

medallion. French, dated 'XI Novembre 1943'

On the other side is an Astrix-like warrior.

One side Cross of Lorraine smashing Swastika - previous tweet. Other side this pic of a Astrix-like warrior.I would love to know the story behind it. I assume it relates to Oyonnax, but does it?

When was it created? How many issued?

Please help and share this post if you can.

Thanks.